"Air" plants get their common name from the fact that they get all of their nutrients from the atmosphere. Most species of Tillandsia have thin, stiff leaves covered in scales, often giving them a fuzzy, gray-green appearance. They have small flowers, usually less than two inches in size.

 

Combined with a simplitic tear drop shaped glass holder nad beded with PNW fallen tree moss and Lichens to creat a lovely addition to your space. All moss, barks and Lichens are gathered off the ground and never harvested from the trees. Lichens grow slowly, with foliose lichens adding between 2 and 5 mm per year, so we always take accept the gift of fallen mosses! 

Air Plant with Teardrop Glass Holder

$22.00Price
  • LIGHT

    Air plants should be kept where they'll receive bright, indirect sunlight or under fluorescent home/office lighting. Periods of direct sunlight are just fine, but more than a few hours of hot sun will deplete the plants of their moisture. If your plant will be in a spot with some pretty direct light, try misting them every couple of days to keep them hydrated.

    WATER

    As a main method of watering your plants, we recommend giving them a thorough rinsing under running water or letting them soak in a bath of water for 20-30 minutes. You can use a bowl, the sink or even the bathtub if you've got a family. After their shower or bath, gently shake the plants to remove any excess water from the base and the leaves, and set out to dry in an area with enough air circulation to dry them out in about 4 hours. If your plants need an in-between watering, misting them with a spray bottle is a great method. A plant in bloom should be rinsed rather than submerged in water, and take care when rinsing the delicate flowers.

    Your plants should be watered once per week, and 2-3 times is recommended for optimal care. A longer, 2-hour soak is recommended every 2-3 weeks. If you are in a drier, hotter climate, more frequent watering or misting will be needed. You'll begin to notice that after watering, your plant's leaves will feel stiffer and full of water and they'll be softer and lighter in color when they're in need of water. Wrinkled or rolled leaves can be a sign of dehydration